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The James Webb Telescope

Started by Slim, April 29, 2022, 11:23:19 AM

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Slim

Very good introduction / overview here:


Slim

First pics from Webb to be released in about ten minutes (supposedly). Joe Biden will be presenting them.

Slim



Hundreds of galaxies, in a patch of sky that you could cover up with a grain of sand extended on your fingertip.

The cosmos is unimaginably massive. The orange objects are images of galaxies, 13 billion years ago.

Nickslikk2112

Some nice Gravitational lensing in there. Awesome.

David L


Nick

Just needs Rush 2112 written over it.


Livestream here shortly https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/ESA_Web_TV

Nick

Amazing but at the same time the images although clearer than the Hubble are just as incomprehensible due to the scales involved. The data analysis from each planet/star may be of more use than the actual images in near/mid/far or whatever infrared type that is shown.

Slim

I had this thought while I was out on my bike and it's been twisting my melon ever since.

Given that any direction you point a telescope in is the direction of the big bang - because space itself has expanded since the moment the Universe started - it follows that if you look sufficiently into the distance, and therefore back in time - you'd actually be looking at the same early stars that you'd see if you pointed the same telescope in a completely different direction.

I think I need to confirm this with a cosmologist, but I do think it must be correct.

pxr5

I watched this documentary on BBC2 last night about the whole development and deployment of the James Webb Space telescope. I was a Systems Engineer yet the work and detail involved just blows my mind:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m00197px/horizon-2022-super-telescope-mission-to-the-edge-of-the-universe

Slim

Quote from: Slim on July 12, 2022, 08:27:19 PMI had this thought while I was out on my bike and it's been twisting my melon ever since.

Given that any direction you point a telescope in is the direction of the big bang - because space itself has expanded since the moment the Universe started - it follows that if you look sufficiently into the distance, and therefore back in time - you'd actually be looking at the same early stars that you'd see if you pointed the same telescope in a completely different direction.

I think I need to confirm this with a cosmologist, but I do think it must be correct.

I think that this probably isn't correct.

Thenop


The Picnic Wasp

Quote from: Slim on July 12, 2022, 09:32:08 AM

Hundreds of galaxies, in a patch of sky that you could cover up with a grain of sand extended on your fingertip.

The cosmos is unimaginably massive. The orange objects are images of galaxies, 13 billion years ago.

Wow!!!


Thenop


The Picnic Wasp

My goodness! It looks like it's made of glass.